Santorum: Academia, Protestantism, and Politics Have All Fallen To Satan!

Share

Well, this is pretty remarkable. It’s not news that Republicans these days are obsessed with outing crafty devils. First there was Rick Perry, who held a prayer rally with the New Apostolic Reformation, a group completely convinced that major American cities are in dire need of (literal) demon-cleansing. But mere demons are too small-time for Rick Santorum: Satan himself, he sincerely believes, is behind the fall of many of our most important institutions: academia, mainstream Protestantism (the Catholic Church having so far been spared, thank God), and politics. Being from academia myself, I can tell you that if I’ve sold my soul to the devil, the horned one has cut me a raw deal – so far I’ve received nothing for my precious soul but pay cuts and committee work.

In any case, if after listening to this excerpt from Santorum’s 2008 speech at Ave Maria University you’re not scared $#%@less at the thought of this guy actually becoming President of the United States, you’re taking way too many meds-

This is not a political war at all. This is not a cultural war. This is a spiritual war. And the Father of Lies has his sights on what you would think the Father of Lies would have his sights on: a good, decent, powerful, influential country – the United States of America. If you were Satan, who would you attack in this day and age? There is no one else to go after other than the United States and that has been the case now for almost two hundred years, once America’s preeminence was sown by our great Founding Fathers.

He didn’t have much success in the early days. Our foundation was very strong, in fact, is very strong. But over time, that great, acidic quality of time corrodes even the strongest foundations. And Satan has done so by attacking the great institutions of America, using those great vices of pride, vanity, and sensuality as the root to attack all of the strong plants that has so deeply rooted in the American tradition.

He was successful. He attacks all of us and he attacks all of our institutions. The place where he was, in my mind, the most successful and first successful was in academia. He understood pride of smart people. He attacked them at their weakest, that they were, in fact, smarter than everybody else and could come up with something new and different. Pursue new truths, deny the existence of truth, play with it because they’re smart. And so academia, a long time ago, fell.

And so what we saw this domino effect, once the colleges fell and those who were being education in our institutions, the next was the church. Now you’d say, ‘wait, the Catholic Church’? No. We all know that this country was founded on a Judeo-Christian ethic but the Judeo-Christian ethic was a Protestant Judeo-Christian ethic, sure the Catholics had some influence, but this was a Protestant country and the Protestant ethic, mainstream, mainline Protestantism, and of course we look at the shape of mainline Protestantism in this country and it is in shambles, it is gone from the world of Christianity as I see it. So they attacked mainline Protestantism, they attacked the Church, and what better way to go after smart people who also believe they’re pious to use both vanity and pride to also go after the Church.

The fourth, and this was harder, now I know you’re going to challenge me on this one, but politics and government was the next to fall. You say, ‘you would think they would be the first to fall, as fallible as we are in politics,’ but people in political life get elected by ordinary folks from lots of places all over the country where the foundations of this country are still strong. So while we may certainly have had examples, the body politic held up fairly well up until the last couple of decades, but it is falling too.

5 thoughts on “Santorum: Academia, Protestantism, and Politics Have All Fallen To Satan!

  1. We don’t need Rick to tell us there’s something wrong with American culture…but it’s not Satan. the fault lies not in the stars, but in ourselves. and right-wing, inquistionists like Santorum are a symptom, not a cure.

  2. I agree, Jim: there is plenty to criticize about the culture, and the state of our politics (as Santorum manifests it) is part of the cultural problem.

    On this general subject, Charles Murray (of The Bell Curve fame) has been making the media rounds, selling his latest book that focuses on what he considers to be the decline of “White culture” since 1960 (the limitation to White culture is supposed to insulate him from the charges of racism that were leveled against The Bell Curve). His way of framing the issue plays right into Santorum’s hands. The problem is that while he correlates a decline in happiness and other indications of diminishing welfare to the decline of marriage, religiosity, and a couple of other social indices, he never makes a convincing argument for a causal connection. No doubt the rise in unhappiness also correlates strongly with the rise of Starbucks coffee, the prevalence of computers, and so on… Finally, at least in the lectures I’ve watched, Murray never considers the possibility that the decline of the American economy may have a lot to do with our cultural problems (and hence also with problems he discusses arising from the upper class losing contact with the working class). I may post more on this in the future.

  3. I read something in the Times this morning, where Santorum was advocating home schooling and he said (correctly) that the public school system was a byproduct of the industrial revolution, an “education” factory. But he was implying that people should go back to home schooling. What about the Industrial Revolution?? Are we going to repeal that too??We’re not an agrarian society anymore.

  4. Good point. Could it be that conservatives want to go back to a fictitious golden age whenever they are (justifiably) dissatisfied with the present, because they cannot imagine new solutions to current problems?

  5. I was thinking the same thing. . . nostalgia for a time that never was. . . I get that feeling when I listen to libertarians as well. I agree with many of their points, but their solutions won’t work in today’s world.

Comments are closed.